HOMEPAGE

Nahal Kane

Judean Desert

 

 

The 1st dry fall

 

 

The route quality:   **/***   

 

 

The route type:

   

Rappelling trip.

The canyon is dry all the year round but be wary about floods during winter rains.

The first dry fall is not equipped at all and other two are equipped with a pair of bolts each one (very minimalistic!) *  

You are responsible to bring with you all needed materials to set rappelling stations (auxiliary ropes, steel rings to pull the rope etc.)

 

Getting there:

 

Drive on the road number 90 along Dead Sea to the south.

After 266 km distance mark you will arrive to the mouth of the Tmarim canyon with a date-palm plantation on the left side of the road. Turn left to a side road and park here. Follow a marked trail (red and then blue) as for the nahal Tmarim rappeling route, but up on the plateau turn left to a dirt road marked green and then take another turn left to a dirt road marked red (for a shortcut keep more left). Follow the road for 0.5-0.3 km (depends on the shortcut) till arrival to the first flat wadi (dry river-bed). This is Nahal Kane and the first dry fall is 300m farther down the wadi.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Route description:

 

Going down the wadi for a 300m you will arrive to a stepped drop of overall depth of about 20-25m while only the first step of the descent (some 7m) may pose a problem. Down-climb a chimney on the left side or use an aid rope. The drop ends at a small flat ground near the edge of the first dry fall where the rappelling station should be placed.

 

 

Approaching the1st dry fall station

 

 

Approaching the1st dry fall station

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There are 3 dry falls to be abseiled:

 

 

1.  40m (vertical, then 10-13m overhang)

The wall is pretty loose in places.

 

No prepared anchors!

The most obvious anchor is a big stone stuck in a chimney on the right side in some 5-6m from the edge (white arrow on the photo bellow). There are more possibilities to strengthen the station but all of them are not too much reliable. Bring your own auxiliary ropes to set the station. You have to leave here some 8-10m of rope at least.

 

 

1st dry fall rappelling station. The arrow points on the chimney with
the stuck stone

 

 

1st dry fall rappelling station

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The 1st dry fall

 

 

The 1st dry fall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.  50m (vertical)

 

The are two drilled steel plates bolted to the face of a big boulder. It is makes good sense to secure them at least for the 1st rappeller (some 20m of auxiliary ropes required)

 

 

2nd dry fall rappelling station

 

 

2nd dry fall rappelling station

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The 2nd dry fall

 

 

The 2nd dry fall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.  85m (mostly sloped, vertical in parts, with 3 wide ledges)

The wall is pretty loose in places.

Be careful when pulling the rope. There is a possibility for the rope to stuck.

 

The are two climbing bolts in the rock step facing the edge and two old steel drilled plates (in poor condition) on the floor.

 

Pay attention: there is an intermediate rappelling station on the second big ledge that enables you to divide the descent into two parts of comparable length. But the station (two drilled steel plates) looks really poor and I would recommend to avoid it even taking in account possible problems with pulling the rope!

 

 

The 3rd dry fall rappelling station

 

 

The 3rd dry fall rappelling station

 

 

The 3rd dry fall

 

 

 

 

 

The intermediate rappelling station

 

 

The 3rd dry fall

 

 

The 3rd dry fall

 

 

 

 

Go down the wadi to the road through boulders and scree slopes (650-700m). 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A view back on the mouth of nahal Kane

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The route quality:

 

*****  - The only one of its kind. A "must do" trip!

****    - Very interesting, highly recommended!

***      - Pretty nice route.

**        - Inexpressive one.

*          - Do it if you have nothing to do...

 

 

* Pay attention! The information is updated for December 2014. Try to check it before starting on your trip.